Mags

Mags West End // Republic of Ireland

Friday, 6th January 2017

'I was really surprised, I suppose, at the identity crisis that Scotland was going through.'

Helene

Helene Govanhill // Denmark

Wednesday, 24th August 2016

‘Everything that I’ve written has almost always been in English. I’m just now coming to reconnect with the Danish language.’

Carol

Carol Knightswood // South Africa

Friday, 15th April 2016

'She said, 'Well, we know that you've got a British passport 'cause your father is British, so you can either leave or we're going to the police'.'

Prabha

Prabha Govanhill // Sri Lanka

Thursday, 7th April 2016

‘Love is that. You can’t say the person is ugly, which religion, which race, you can’t say it.'

Sunny

Sunny George's Cross // Lithuania

Thursday, 25th February 2016

‘The way I was brought up was that honesty was more important than politeness. So that was a hard lesson to learn once I arrived in the UK.'

Fuad

Fuad Woodside // Azerbaijan

Wednesday, 10th February 2016

'Glasgow for me is like anchovies. First you might not like it, but as you taste more it grows on you'

Martin

Martin Shawlands // Zimbabwe

Thursday, 11th February 2016

'I used to wear dreadlocks and they were removed, and one of the judges turned around and said that it's not me in the photos.'

Sean

Sean Kelvinside // USA

Saturday, 5th December 2015

‘I have no roots here at all, but we have a kid now. The kid is from Scotland.’

Michelle

Michelle Cathcart // Australia

Wednesday, 16th December 2015

'My father flew to England and left my mother with four children to travel from Australia to England on a cargo ship for eight weeks.'

Štěpán

Štěpán Dennistoun // Czech Republic

Tuesday, 19th January 2016

'Through voluntary jobs I met a lot of people. A lot of them are good friends and life is much better now.'

Leela

Leela Milngavie // India

Monday, 8th February 2016

‘I’d often joke and say ‘Well the Brits stayed for 200 odd years, I’m just returning the compliment!’’

Tim

Tim West End // Thailand

Thursday, 4th February 2016

‘I get two set questions. One is ‘Where are you from?’ and then the second one is ‘Why don’t you sound like where you’re from?’’

Pinar

Pinar Glasgow South // Turkey

Thursday, 4th February 2016

'If you have money for war, I'm sure we have money to build houses and accept as many people as we can'

Sarah

Sarah Cathcart // New Zealand

Sunday, 10th January 2016

'What I heard from Maori people and Maori activists that I met was ‘Don’t come to us, look to your own ancestry to fill the gaps'

Juliana

Juliana Govanhill // Brazil

Friday, 8th January 2016

'I live a neighbourhood that there is a lot of poverty, and for me this is strange to see in one of the wealthiest countries'

Gameli

Gameli Pollok // Ghana

Friday, 8th January 2016

'If we also move and another person comes, and they do the same to them, when will it stop?'

Reel

Reel Dennistoun // Sudan

Monday, 4th January 2016

'My mum should be a Scot in many ways because she has that kind of 'get on with it' attitude'

Laura

Laura Maryhill // Spain

Thursday, 3rd December 2015

'I have realised I'm stronger than I thought at the beginning'

Karie

Karie Botanic Gardens // Denmark

Wednesday, 25th November 2015

'There's a lot of talk of immigration at the moment, and people often don't realise that I'm one of the 'baddies''

Vasso

Vasso Crosshill // Greece

Friday, 27th November 2015

'I already had two places I could call home, but I never felt at home in either of them'

Thomas

Thomas Maryhill Park // Denmark

Thursday, 15th October 2015

'To be honest, I think of myself as European and a Glaswegian more than I think of myself as a Dane'

Yoko

Yoko Paisley // Malawi

Tuesday, 3rd November 2015

'I would love it if Glasgow could be educated a bit. Just a bit.'

Alisa

Alisa Dennistoun // Italy

Sunday, 30th August 2015

‘Sometimes I feel like I’m in Naples in Italy, because the people are very similar’

Elwira

Elwira Partick // Poland

Thursday, 29th October 2015

'That first year in Glasgow was the worst year of my entire life. Not even the communist past in Poland became so painful in my memory.'

Nikolaos

Nikolaos Dennistoun // Greece

Saturday, 19th September 2015

‘Let’s be honest it’s not like London, but it’s definitely better than Edinburgh’

The Settled in Glasgow Oral History Archive (SIGOHA) is an online collection of conversations with people who have settled in and around Glasgow having been born outside of the UK. Oral history is the study of history through the stories of normal people. Daily experiences and memories that may seem ordinary to one person might hold great meaning to someone else. Furthermore, oral history allows people to make their own history. SIGOHA creates a space for Glaswegians who were born outside the UK to tell their own stories, instead of being spoken for. Through their experiences of living in other countries before moving to Glasgow, SIGOHA participants can provide perspectives on the city that may never have been considered by people who were born in the UK. Furthermore, through participants’ stories of their lives before moving to Glasgow, SIGOHA also documents the histories of many cities and countries around the world. SIGOHA is an on-going project and we are always looking for more participants. Whether you have lived in Glasgow for days or decades, we would like to hear your story. If you would like to be involved, please see the Contact section below. We had an exhibition! Read more here: http://glasgowanewexhibition.tumblr.com/

JESSIE LAWSON is a support worker and freelance writer and photographer based in Glasgow. If you have any questions about SIGOHA, or would like to be involved in the project, please contact: settledinglasgow@gmail.com. Thank you to our wonderful volunteers: KALINA BOYTCHEVA, EUAN REILLY, VLADYSLAV MEDVENSKY, CHARLOTTE CAMPBELL, ANNE MADSEN, NADIA STUART, KATHERINE MACKINNON, SVENJA TIMMINS, ZHADA ROBERTSON and JOEY SIMONS for helping to transcribe our conversations.